• Simply… woman

    Sara Luna e Claudine
  • I support ANIMAL RIGHTS

  • me and my girl :-)
  • Mi sento unicamente una "Cittadina del Mondo"
    figlia, madre, amica, compagna, donna...
    Ho viaggiato lungo rotte conosciute ed altre ignote, per lavoro ma anche per curiosità o solo per il desiderio di scoprire nuovi luoghi!
    L'esperienza a contatto con altri popoli, religioni e culture, mi ha insegnato a venerare Madre Natura ed ogni forma di vita che ci conduce a valutare precetti inconfutabili, ma che purtroppo troppi ignorano nel più assoluto egoismo.
    Vi apro le porte del mio mondo virtuale... seguitemi lungo l'itinerante scorrer d'acqua lasciando traccia di vissuto.

  • What to say about Claudine? She is passionate about living a present, balanced and authentic life, with a healthy dose of humor! She loves to travel the world, explore new places, people and food, but equally loves to retreat into silent solitude. She is a writer who follows a hidden path, into an unfamiliar world. If you just surrender and go with her on her eerie journey, you will find that you have surrendered to enchantment, as if in a voluptuous and fantastic dream. She makes you believe everything she sees in her fantasy and dreams. But as well you take a journey to the frozen mountain peaks of the north of Europe, to the crowded sweating streets of Mexico or Africa. Her characters are wonderfully real and wholly believable perfectly situated in her richly textured prose. She’s a lovely person and she writes with exquisite powers of description! She’s simply great! R. McKelley

    ***

    Chi è Claudine? Lei è appassionata nel vivere al presente una vita equilibrata e autentica, con una sana dose di humour! Ama viaggiare per il mondo, esplorare nuovi luoghi, persone e cibo, ma ugualmente ama ritirarsi in solitudine, nel silenzio. E' una scrittrice che segue un sentiero nascosto, verso un mondo sconosciuto. Se solo vi arrendete e andate con lei in questa spettacolare avventura, realizzerete che vi siete confidati all’incantevole, come in un sogno fantastico ed avvolgente. Vi farà credere ad ogni cosa che lei vede nei suoi stessi sogni e fantasie. Ma inizierete anche un viaggio verso le cime ghiacciate del nord Europa, verso le strade affollate del Messico o Africa. I protagonisti sono magnificamente reali e totalmente credibili stupendamente inseriti nella ricca trama di prosa. E’ una “grande” persona e scrive con uno squisito potere descrittivo. E’ semplicemente magnifica.

  • Read the Printed Word!
  • Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Check
  • I'm an Ethical Author
  • Disclaimer

    Unless otherwise indicated, the images and multimedia products published are taken directly from the Web and are copyright of the individual authors. Their publication does not intend to violate any copyright; in the event that a violation has occurred, please report it to me and I will arrange for its immediate removal.

  • Categories

Fighting for them: the creatures without voice

26.8.2020 Corriere del Ticino

The global extinction of many species of flora and fauna, or a reduction / loss of the same in a specific natural environment, can be a temporary or permanent phenomenon depending on the situation. In the case of deforestation, the disappearance of the habitat of many species, without the possibility of restoration, generates an irreversible loss of biodiversity.
Small changes within a balanced ecosystem can have a dramatic influence on the food chain that would lead to a reduction in biodiversity. This, in turn, leads to reduced ecosystem services and ultimately poses an immediate danger to food security, even to humanity itself.
Currently, the global loss of biodiversity is estimated to be between 100 and 1000 times greater than it naturally occurs, and worse, a further increase due to anthropogenic pressure is expected. About 70% of the loss is caused by agriculture alone. 1/3 of the cultivable area of ​​our planet is used for crops and for grazing livestock, therefore largely destined for the breeding of “slaughter meat”.
The relative deforestation to increase forage production, monocultures and urbanization are man-made, and not always for vital reasons.
Added to this is the greenhouse effect mainly caused by agriculture which in addition to destroying biodiversity by converting natural habitats into “intensive cultivation systems”, uses highly polluting agents such as pesticides or fertilizers that contaminate the air and soil.
And so far, I think most readers are aware that the danger is imminent, despite the / negativists, / who still claim that all is well, continuing to follow a disrespectful lifestyle towards the problem that is collective.
We are in a democratic country, where freedom of thought (and writing) is given to each of us.
My obstinacy in trying to get a specific message across obviously creates resentment and grudges. We are not all tuned to the same wave, and there are many “vibrations”, however I can only invoke common sense and the fundamental awareness that each of us should do. Each of us can change our “ecological footprint” by reducing or eliminating, for example, the consumption of animal products, or by preferring the use of public or non-polluting transport. For many it is easy, for others more difficult but not impossible.
In this context, we must also in Switzerland safeguard the different ecosystems and biodiversity, allowing all the species that populate our plains, mountains and plateaus, to coexist as Nature itself foresees, giving each other their own space.
Given the above, we cannot accept an amendment to the Hunting Law which will provide the Federal Government with “carte blanche” or the ability to modify the list of protected animals at will (for example, lynx and beaver, given the favorable votes of the commissions) and without more faculty to intervene by means of popular votes.
Unfortunately, the trade associations are making a big anti-wolf propaganda, bringing up every possible absurdity and trying to convince the people to carry out a wicked act by approving the amendment of the law. It should be emphasized that the current content of the law already provides for the elimination of problematic wolf specimens.
Considering that the attempt to restore the atavistic fears towards the Bad Wolf did not work, some people have begun to take it out on the protection dogs of the herds but failing to provide true information and trying to pass a single message: let’s kill all the great predators that are dangerous.

I am of the opinion that it is important to provide correct information, not to provide misleading information with an attempt to confuse the reader. Shouldn’t moral righteousness be above one’s interests?

Like many other citizens, I defend our ecosystem, Nature with flora and fauna, as we wish to bequeath to the next generations a livable world, where everything has its living space… already very limited due to the presence of Man.

…oOo…

Lottando per loro: le creature senza voce

L’estinzione a livello globale di molte specie di flora e fauna, oppure una riduzione/perdita delle stesse in un preciso ambiente naturale, può essere un fenomeno temporaneo o permanente a differenza della situazione. Nel caso di deforestazione, la scomparsa dell’habitat di molte specie, senza una possibilità di ripristino, genera una perdita irreversibile della biodiversità.
Piccoli cambiamenti all’interno di un ecosistema equilibrato, possono avere un’influenza drammatica sulla catena alimentare che porterebbe ad una riduzione della biodiversità. Questo, a sua volta, conduce a servizi ecosistemici ridotti e alla fine rappresenta un pericolo immediato per la sicurezza alimentare, anche per l’Umanità stessa.
Attualmente, la perdita globale della biodiversità è stimata tra le 100 e 1000 volte superiore di quanto non occorra in modo naturale, e peggio, è previsto un ulteriore aumento causato dalla pressione antropica. Circa il 70% della perdita è causato dalla sola agricoltura. 1/3 della superficie coltivabile del nostro pianeta è utilizzato per le colture e per il pascolo di bestiame, quindi in gran parte destinato all’allevamento di “carne da macello”.
La relativa deforestazione per accrescere la produzione di foraggio, le monoculture e l’urbanizzazione sono originate dall’uomo, e non sempre per ragioni vitali.
Si aggiunge l’effetto serra principalmente causato dall’agricoltura la quale oltre a distruggere la biodiversità convertendo gli habitat naturali in “sistemi di coltivazione intensiva”, utilizza agenti fortemente inquinanti quali pesticidi o fertilizzanti che contaminano l’aria ed il suolo.
E fin qui, penso che la maggior parte dei lettori sia consapevole che il pericolo è imminente, malgrado i /negativisti,/ che ancora affermano che tutto va bene, continuando a seguire uno stile di vita irriguardoso nei confronti della problematica che è collettiva.
Siamo in un paese democratico, dove la libertà di pensiero (e di scrittura) è data ad ognuno di noi.
La mia ostinazione nel cercare di far passare un messaggio specifico, evidentemente, crea astio e rancori. Non tutti siamo sintonizzati sulla stessa onda, e di “vibrazioni” ve ne sono tante, comunque posso unicamente invocare il buonsenso e la fondamentale presa di coscienza che ognuno di noi dovrebbe fare. Ognuno di noi può cambiare la propria “impronta ecologica” riducendo o azzerando ad esempio il consumo di prodotti animali, o prediligendo l’utilizzo di trasporti pubblici o non inquinanti. Per molti è facile, per altri più difficile ma non impossibile.
In questo contesto, dobbiamo anche in Svizzera salvaguardare i diversi ecosistemi e la biodiversità, permettendo a tutte le specie che popolano le nostre pianure, montagne e altipiani, di coesistere come la stessa Natura prevede, fornendo gli uni agli altri il proprio spazio.
Visto quanto sopra, non possiamo accettare una modifica della Legge sulla Caccia che fornirà al Governo federale “carta bianca” ovvero la possibilità di modificare la lista degli animali protetti a piacimento (ad esempio lince e castoro, visto i voti favorevoli delle commissioni) e senza più facoltà di intervento per mezzo di votazioni popolari.
Purtroppo le associazioni di categoria stanno facendo una grossa propaganda anti-lupo, tirando in ballo ogni assurdità possibile e cercando di convincere il popolo a compiere un atto scellerato approvando la modifica della legge. Va sottolineato che l’attuale contenuto della Legge già prevede l’eliminazione di esemplari di lupo problematici.
Considerando che il tentativo di ripristinare le ataviche paure nei confronti del Lupo Cattivo non sono funzionate, alcune persone hanno iniziato a prendersela con i cani da protezione delle greggi omettendo però di fornire informazioni vere e cercando di far passare un messaggio univoco: ammazziamo tutti i grandi predatori che sono pericolosi.

Sono dell’avviso che è importante un’informazione corretta, non fornire notizie fuorvianti con il tentativo di confondere chi legge. La rettitudine morale non dovrebbe essere al di sopra dei propri interessi?

Come molti altri cittadini, difendo il nostro ecosistema, la Natura con flora e fauna, poiché desideriamo lasciare in eredità alle prossime generazioni un mondo vivibile, dove ogni cosa ha il suo spazio vitale… già molto ridotto a causa della presenza dell’Uomo.

What about the Wolf? * Cosa dire del Lupo?

Wolves2

.

Over the centuries, in different cultures, the wolf has taken on opposite meanings. Revered as a divinity or insulted as a devil, he often paid for his crimes with his life.
During the Middle Ages in Europe, myth and superstition assumed significant importance. For example, we believed in werewolves. Religion exploited this fearful image and during the Inquisition, it was used as a metaphor to maintain control with coercion, which had lasted for centuries.
When European settlers arrived in America, they brought this dark wolf with them into their imagination.
In contrast, the natives of North America admired and emulated the wolf. Native Americans respected his hunting skills and honored him because he provided food for the community. For some, he was seen as a wise, powerful, or instinctive hunter. In fact, a teacher of tactics that humans could emulate in buffalo or caribou hunting.
The wolf has been wiped out across much of Europe in the past four centuries. Thanks to the “bounty hunt”, those who killed a wolf were rewarded with money. Between 1850 and 1900 more than a million wolves were exterminated and in 1907 the call for the total extinction of the species was launched. It is known that one of the most used practices was that of poisoning.
Herds of wolves have survived in mountainous Spain, France, Italy, and wooded Finland. In Asia, a number remain in remote corners of the Middle East and in the Russian and Mongolian steppes.
A wolf is neither good nor bad, yet it seems that the negative myth has survived, and this although many currently understand the true nature of the wolf.

Today the wolf is returning to Europe, but as its population grows, conflicts with humans are also growing. The debate over wolf control is very emotional. Some want the wolf to be eliminated, while others think that wolves should never be killed.
Breeders fear that wolves will eat their livestock. Today in Switzerland, in areas where wolves come into conflict with farmers, it is already possible to kill “problematic” ones with government authorization. In the United States, but also in Europe, today there is a strong anti-wolf lobby, where some judges and political leaders are lobbying for this lobby.
In the United States and Canada, wolves are substantially protected, but in other countries such as Russia and parts of Eastern Europe wolves are wildly annihilated. More and more wolves come into conflict with men, in the poor rural areas of Russia, for example, hunting for deer and other wild animals have increased causing competition between man and wolf. With less game to hunt, wolves look for other food sources such as sheep and domestic cattle.
Modern reindeer farming is also in conflict. As a result, wolf populations are sparse in some regions in eastern Russia and Alaska. For example, in Chukotka, there has been an official wolf shooting policy from helicopters to protect reindeer herds.
Local legends say that a balance was established between wolves and men, with wolves taking what they needed from the herds and that the Ciukci (Russian population in northeastern Siberia) hunted only single wolves that had become unpredictable killers.
Is it possible that these balances can be restored, not only in reindeer husbandry but in all human endeavors?

The anthropization of the territories has subtracted areas that previously belonged to the fauna, we have desertificated others, both for direct effect and with the devastating climate changes.
Human population growth, therefore, causes conflicts between wolves and humans since the number of wild areas in which wolves can live has drastically decreased. It is known that wolves need a lot of territories, far from humans, to live and grow their offspring.
An agreement would be desirable to provide protective solutions for farm animals. If the farmers used extensively preventive measures (fences where possible, control of the herds/flocks, dogs for the protection of the flocks, the presence of shepherds, etc.) the wolf and the man could coexist better.
The solution does not lie at the extremes of the wolf debate: although most breeders don’t hate wolves, when they kill their cattle they see no other solution. Nature’s defenders think wolves should never be killed for any reason. The fact is that when the man and the wolf come into conflict, it is usually the wolf that leaves its skin.
In our country Switzerland, the current hunting law already allows the “problematic wolves” to be shot down, consequently, the modification of this law (the national vote of 17 May 2020) would favor the killing with much fewer restrictions not only of the wolf but also of other animals protected. The risk of the wolf’s new extinction due to the conflict between animal and man, caused by the latter, is high.
This once cunning, revered and respected hunter, is now only seen as a parasite and a danger to livestock. We must find a balance with those who want to see the
wolf controlled, their concerns must not be rejected, they must become part of the debate on the conservation of each species. Unfortunately, wolves still live in the imagination as shadows of evil, fueled by error and fiction.
When humans interfere in the life of wild animals, it becomes their responsibility to provide them with a healthy environment in which to live. This should be our legacy.

…oOo…

Nel corso dei secoli, nelle diverse culture, il lupo ha assunto significati opposti tra loro. Venerato come una divinità o insultato come un diavolo, esso ha spesso pagato con la sua vita i crimini che non aveva commesso.
Durante il Medioevo in Europa, il mito e la superstizione assunsero un’importanza rilevante. Ad esempio si credeva nei lupi mannari. La religione sfruttò questa paurosa immagine e durante l’Inquisizione, fu utilizzata quale metafora per mantenere il controllo con la coercizione perdurata per secoli.
Quando i coloni europei arrivarono in America, portarono con sé questo lupo oscuro nella loro immaginazione.
Al contrario, gli indigeni del Nord America ammiravano ed emulavano il lupo. I nativi americani rispettavano le sue capacità di caccia e lo onoravano perché forniva cibo per la comunità. Per alcuni era visto come un saggio, un potente o un cacciatore istintivo. In effetti un insegnante di tattiche che gli umani potevano emulare nella caccia ai bufali o caribù.
Il lupo è stato sterminato in gran parte dell’Europa negli ultimi quattro secoli. Grazie alla “caccia alle taglie”, chi uccideva un lupo era ricompensato con soldi. Tra il 1850 ed il 1900 più di un milione di lupi furono sterminati e nel 1907 fu varato il bando per l’estinzione totale della specie. È risaputo che una delle pratiche maggiormente utilizzate era quella dell’avvelenamento.
Branchi di lupi sono sopravvissuti nelle montagnose Spagna, Francia, Italia e nella boscosa Finlandia. In Asia un numero rimane in angoli remoti del Medio Oriente e nelle steppe russe e mongole.
Un lupo non è né buono né cattivo, eppure sembra che il Mito negativo sia sopravvissuto, e questo anche se attualmente molti comprendono la vera natura del lupo.

Oggigiorno il lupo sta tornando in Europa, ma con l’aumentare della sua popolazione, si ampliano anche i conflitti con gli umani. Il dibattito sul controllo del lupo è molto emotivo. Alcuni vogliono che il lupo sia eliminato, mentre altri pensano che i lupi non debbano mai essere uccisi.
Gli allevatori temono che i lupi mangino il loro bestiame. Oggi in Svizzera nelle aree in cui i lupi entrano in conflitto con gli allevatori, è già possibile l’uccisione di quelli “problematici” con l’autorizzazione da parte del governo. Negli Stati Uniti, ma anche in Europa, oggigiorno c’è una forte lobby anti-lupo, dove alcuni giudici e leader politici fanno pressione a favore di questa lobby.
Negli Stati Uniti e in Canada, i lupi sono sostanzialmente protetti, ma in altri paesi come la Russia e parte dell’Europa orientale i lupi sono selvaggiamente annientati. Sempre più i lupi entrano in conflitto con gli uomini, nelle povere aree rurali della Russia, ad esempio, la caccia al cervo e altri animali selvatici è aumentata causando competizione tra uomo e lupo. Con meno selvaggina da cacciare i lupi cercano altre fonti alimentari come gli ovini e bovini domestici.
Anche l’allevamento moderno di renne è in conflitto. Di conseguenza le popolazioni di lupi sono scarse in alcune regioni in Russia orientale e Alaska. Ad esempio a Chukotka si è assistito a una politica ufficiale di tiro ai lupi dagli elicotteri per proteggere le mandrie di renne.
Le leggende locali raccontano che tra lupi e uomini si stabilisse un equilibrio, con i lupi che prendevano ciò di cui avevano bisogno dalle mandrie e che i Ciukci (popolazione russa nella Siberia nord Orientale) cacciavano solo singoli lupi che erano diventati assassini imprevedibili.
È forse possibile che tali equilibri possano essere ristabiliti, non solo nell’allevamento delle renne ma in tutti gli sforzi umani?

L’antropizzazione dei territori ha sottratto aree che prima appartenevano alla fauna, ne abbiamo desertificate altre, sia per effetto diretto, sia con i devastanti cambiamenti climatici.
La crescita demografica umana causa perciò conflitti tra lupo e uomini poiché la quantità di aree selvagge in cui i lupi possono vivere è drasticamente diminuita. È risaputo che i lupi abbiano necessità di molto territorio, lontani dagli umani, per vivere e crescere la loro prole.
Sarebbe auspicabile un accordo affinché si provveda a trovare delle soluzioni protettive degli animali da allevamento. Se gli allevatori utilizzassero estensivamente misure preventive (recinzioni dove possibile, controllo delle mandrie/greggi, cani da protezione delle greggi, presenza di pastori ecc.) il lupo e l’uomo potrebbero convivere meglio.
La soluzione non sta agli estremi del dibattito sul lupo: anche se la maggior parte degli allevatori non odiano i lupi, quando questi uccidono il loro bestiame non vedono altra soluzione. I difensori della natura pensano che i lupi non debbano mai essere uccisi per nessun motivo. Fatto sta che quando l’uomo e il lupo entrano in conflitto, solitamente è il lupo a lasciarci la pelle.
L’attuale legge sulla caccia già permette che i “lupi problematici” siano abbattuti, di conseguenza la modifica di questa legge (la votazione nazionale del 17 maggio 2020) favorirebbe l’uccisione con molte meno restrizioni non solo del lupo ma anche di altri animali protetti. Il rischio di nuova estinzione del lupo a causa del conflitto tra animale e uomo, causato da quest’ultimo, è elevato.
Questo cacciatore un tempo astuto, riverito e rispettato è ora solo visto come un parassita e un pericolo per il bestiame. Dobbiamo ricercare un equilibrio con coloro che vogliono vedere il lupo controllato, le loro preoccupazioni non devono essere respinte, devono entrare a far parte del dibattito sulla conservazione di ogni specie. Purtroppo i lupi vivono ancora nell’immaginazione come ombre del male, alimentate dall’errore e dalla finzione.
Quando gli esseri umani interferiscono nella vita degli animali selvatici, diventa loro responsabilità di fornire loro un ambiente sano in cui vivere. Questo dovrebbe essere il nostro retaggio.

Revisione della legge sulla caccia in Svizzera

In Switzerland only

Ultime notizie odierne (19.6.2019) comunicato del WWF Svizzera: la revisione della legge sulla caccia -che dovrebbe consentire l’abbattimento agevolato di specie protette- non verrà discussa nella sessione estiva ma è stata spostata in autunno. Le motivazioni sono futili: così che durante la campagna elettorale non dovranno spiegare come mai sono favorevoli ad una legge così assurda….

Di conseguenza,  la raccolta delle firme contro la revisione della legge sulla caccia inizierà in autunno! Noi ci prepariamo!

Se vuoi aiutare anche tu questo REFERENDUM, compila il sottostante formulario lasciando i tuoi dati e la quantità di firme che potresti raccogliere. Ti invieremo via e-mail i moduli non appena saranno disponibili. Grazie di vero cuore per il tuo prezioso sostegno!

.

Scelte sbagliate, dettate da paure ataviche (e dall’ignoranza)

vedi articolo apparso sulla stampa CdT 9.5.2019

 

Easier to break down wolves.  Wrong choices, dictated by atavistic fears (and ignorance)


Wolves and bears in the viewfinder: the Swiss National Council has decided to loosen the conditions of regulation of the great predators, making their killing easier. The deputies went beyond the Government’s demands. The attempts of the left to downsize the project are in vain. Some nature protection groups have already threatened the referendum; the WWF, for its part, speaks of a “killing law”. The dossier now returns to the States. The people should have the last word.

We are ready for the referendum! and we will fight until the last…

 

Lupo1

Lupo2

Lupo3

Lupo4

Lupo5

Lupo6

Lupo7

Lupo8

 

 

Interview with “Mr. Bad Wolf” * Intervista con il “Grosso Lupo Cattivo”

c_Jiajia_Flickr_Wolf

picture copyright Jiajia on Flickr.com

Original post form: Wildlife reporter

Wildlife-Reporter: If we would have a “TIME” magazine type of nomination, you would definitely be on the cover of the 2017 edition. Not once you made the headline in Europe, you made a remarkable comeback in Greece, France, Italy and even Germany, you have been subject of conflict between wildlife protection NGOs and government in Norway, and it is 3rd year in a row when the famous Yellowstone National Park in U.S. exceeds 4 Mil tourists, where you are the main attraction!

Mr. Wolf: Usually for us attracting human attention means troubles, that is how you would explain our nocturnal habits, shy nature and illusive appearance! Nevertheless is true and there is hope, that with support of NGOs, we may take back our place in the ecosystem in Europe! But our recent comeback is rather due to abundant wild prey (after an extended period without predators) and our survival and adaptability skills, but future is far from secured, under threat by hunting, poaching, loss of habitat (including lack of natural corridors to unite our wild populations) and human transport networks, more and more developed and wildlife un-friendly! Without human society understanding and acceptance, we may lose this survival battle and we may be bound to limited spaces within ZOOs or national parks, as element of tourism industry and not as an essential part of a healthy ecosystem!

W-R: How the nick-name “Big Bad” Wolf was attributed to you and sticked for such log time?

Mr. W: Personally I prefer the nick-name “Guardian of the forest”, as it is closer to our role in the ecosystem, being on the nature’s top of the food chain, regulating the number of herbivores, which would otherwise multiply too much and would exhaust the food resources! It is a typical natural predator-prey relationship, assuring the ecosystem balance and long-term survival of predator, prey and plants! The term “Big” is rather subjective of human imagination, we are not bigger than some dogs for example, our size is perfectly suited to environment and size of wild prey we rely on, and the term “Bad” does not even find a place in nature, where as I mentioned, we all live in a balanced dependency, this is the natural state of a healthy eco-system, there is no such thing as good or bad wild animal, each has its role in the ecosystem!

W-R: Tell us more about yourself, what people should learn?

Mr. W: Our relationship with humans goes back more than 10.000 years ago, and has not always been bad. Some early humans were benefitting from our hunting skills and were often taking our prey but also some of our ancestors found in people a source of security, and they left the wilderness to be now part of human societies, these are modern day dogs, also called “human’s best friend”! But most of us continued our way in the wilderness, as we did for millions of years. We are not so different from people in certain regards, we have a complex family structure around an Alpha pair, we communicate between each-other, we defend a territory, we compete with our kind as well as other predators for food, to be able to raise our families, which, same as with humans, is our top priority, human parents can understand this!

W-R: How does a typical day in your life look like?

Mr. W: Depends really on the season! In winter we live in an extended pack format, we are more sociable and very mobile, we could easily cover 40 to 60 km in one night, as we are not bound to one place since our babies have grown and they can keep up with us. Most activity is focused on hunting, where tasks are split between team members. In a pack, as well as with help of deeper snow, it should be easier for us to make a successful hunt, but not all wild animals we encounter are being turned into food, we rely on our senses to detect certain weaknesses in our prey, mainly old age and possible diseases. With this, we may have the chance to catch our food once per week, that is a 1 in 10 chance of success! In summer, in a light pack format, we are bound to our nursery place, where we have to return after every meal we find, to feed our youngsters as well the dedicated nurse wolf assigned to take care of the cubs! And regardless of season, we are also busy protecting from other predators, or marking the boundaries of our territory to keep other packs at distance!

W-R: Did you eat the Red Riding Hood or not?

Mr. W: Continuously hunted and persecuted by people during centuries, we learned to associate the smell of people with danger, from early age, even if we never saw a human before. Therefore we run away at first human scent, normally never get close to humans. In rare case, when a wolf catches rabies, it may than get closer and bite people, or anything that comes across! Otherwise, humans have nothing to fear, wolves do not bite nor eat humans! On the contrary, it is our kind being hunted, trapped, poisoned, cursed, blamed and driven to extinction by humans! However folklore has its role in influencing humans, what is interesting is that at an early age children rather like wolves and other wild animals and nature, it is later on that their opinion changes in the opposite direction, and here people need to work more on education and keeping touch with nature in order to avoid this derail.

W-R: What about the ubiquitous accusations from part of farmers and killing of their livestock?

Mr. W: These accusations are surely over-exaggerated! Studies proved that a cow is statistically more likely to be hit by thunder, ran by a car or die from diseases, rather than being killed by a wolf. Sheep can also be easily protected by guarding dogs, very old and efficient method! Exceptions happen, and this is also human’s fault, when live-stock is left to graze in wild areas without guarding dogs, and wild prey is exceptionally rare, and when young wolves, potentially orphaned by hunters, may have to attack live-stock or face starvation!

W-R: Any wishes for 2018 and beyond?

Mr. W: Our biggest existential threat today is human misunderstanding! If people would understand our role in the ecosystem, and how the ecosystem and planet really work, we would all be able to live side by side, in harmony, as we did for millions of years! I wish therefore more understanding, peace, more wisdom and a healthy ecosystem for all to share and enjoy! And to all people fans, wishing you an excellent holiday time, together with dear ones, Merry Christmas and a Happy 2018 Year, full of good news from wilderness!

…oOo…

 

Vedi articolo originale al seguente link:

https://wildlife-reporter.com/2017/12/14/exclusive-interview-with-the-big-bad-wolf

Reporter Fauna Selvatica: Se avessimo una “nomination” sulla rivista TIME, saresti sicuramente sulla copertina dell’edizione 2017. Non una volta hai occupato i titoli della stampa in Europa, ma hai fatto un notevole ritorno in Grecia, Francia, Italia e persino in Germania, sei stato oggetto di conflitto tra le ONG e il governo norvegese, ed è il 3° anno consecutivo che il famoso Parco Nazionale di Yellowstone negli Stati Uniti supera i 4 milioni di turisti, dove tu sei l’attrazione principale!

 

Signor Lupo: Solitamente per noi attirare l’attenzione umana significa procurarsi problemi. Così si spiegano le nostre abitudini notturne, la natura timida e l’aspetto evanescente! Tuttavia speriamo di riprendere il nostro posto nell’ecosistema in Europa con il supporto delle ONG!  Il nostro recente ritorno è piuttosto dovuto alle abbondanti prede selvagge (dopo un lungo periodo senza predatori) e alle nostre capacità di sopravvivenza e adattabilità, ma il futuro è lontano dall’essere sicuro, minacciato dalla caccia, dal bracconaggio, dalla perdita di habitat (compresa la mancanza di corridoi naturali per unire le nostre popolazioni selvatiche) e le reti di trasporto degli uomini, sempre più sviluppate e la natura selvaggia non amichevole! Senza la comprensione e l’accettazione della società umana, potremmo perdere questa battaglia di sopravvivenza e potremmo essere circoscritti a spazi limitati all’interno degli ZOO o dei parchi nazionali, come elemento dell’industria turistica e non come una parte essenziale di un ecosistema sano!

Reporter Fauna Selvatica: Come ti è stato attribuito il soprannome “Grande Lupo Cattivo” che ti è rimasto appiccicato per tutto questo tempo?

Signor Lupo: Personalmente preferisco il soprannome “Guardiano della Foresta”, in quanto è più vicino al nostro ruolo nell’ecosistema. Essendo in cima della catena alimentare naturale, regoliamo il numero di erbivori, che altrimenti si moltiplicherebbero molto ed esaurirebbero le risorse alimentari! È una tipica relazione predatore naturale-preda, che garantisce l’equilibrio dell’ecosistema e la sopravvivenza a lungo termine di predatori, prede e piante! Il termine “grande” è piuttosto assegnato dall’immaginazione umana, infatti esistono cani di dimensioni più grosse di noi. La nostra taglia si adatta perfettamente all’ambiente e alle dimensioni delle prede selvatiche su cui facciamo affidamento. Il termine “cattivo” non trova nemmeno un posto in natura, dove viviamo tutti in una dipendenza equilibrata, questo è lo stato naturale di un ecosistema sano; non esiste un animale selvatico buono o cattivo, ognuno ha il suo ruolo nell’ecosistema!

Reporter Fauna Selvatica: Raccontaci di più su te stesso, cosa dovrebbero imparare le persone?

Signor Lupo: La nostra relazione con gli umani risale a più di 10’000 anni fa e non è sempre stata cattiva. I primi umani beneficiavano delle nostre capacità di caccia e spesso prendevano la nostra preda, ma anche alcuni dei nostri antenati trovavano nelle persone una fonte di sicurezza, e lasciavano le terre selvagge per far parte delle società umane: come i cani moderni, chiamati anche “Il migliore amico dell’uomo”! La maggior parte di noi ha continuato però la propria strada nel deserto, come abbiamo fatto per milioni di anni. Non siamo così diversi dalle persone in certi aspetti, abbiamo una struttura familiare complessa attorno ad una coppia alfa, comunichiamo tra di noi, difendiamo un territorio, competiamo con i nostri simili e altri predatori per il cibo, per essere in grado per crescere le nostre famiglie, che, come per gli umani, è la nostra priorità. I genitori umani possono capirlo!

Reporter Fauna Selvatica: come si svolge una giornata tipo nella tua vita?

Signor Lupo: Dipende davvero dalla stagione! In inverno viviamo in un formato di gruppo esteso, siamo più socievoli e molto mobili, potremmo facilmente coprire da 40 a 60 km in una notte, dato che non siamo legati a un posto da quando i nostri cuccioli sono cresciuti e possono stare al passo con noi. La maggior parte delle attività si concentra sulla caccia, con attività suddivise tra i membri del team. Grazie alla neve più profonda, in un branco è più facile cacciare con successo. Non tutti gli animali selvatici che incontriamo sono però trasformati in cibo: infatti ci affidiamo ai nostri sensi per rilevare alcune debolezze nella nostra preda, principalmente vecchiaia e possibili malattie. Così riusciamo a prendere il nostro cibo una volta a settimana, con una possibilità di successo di 1 su 10!

In estate, in un gruppo più piccolo, siamo legati al nostro “asilo nido”, dove dobbiamo tornare dopo ogni pasto che troviamo, per sfamare i nostri giovani nonché il lupo sorvegliante che si prende cura dei cuccioli!

In ogni stagione, siamo impegnati a proteggerci dagli altri predatori o a segnare i confini del nostro territorio per tenere lontani altri branchi!

Reporter Fauna Selvatica: Hai mangiato il Cappuccetto Rosso o no?

Signor Lupo: Continuamente cacciato e perseguitato dalle persone durante i secoli, abbiamo imparato ad associare l’odore delle persone al pericolo fin dalla tenera età, anche se non abbiamo mai visto un umano prima. Quindi scappiamo al primo odore umano, normalmente non avviciniamo mai gli umani. In rari casi, se un lupo, come altri predatori, prende la rabbia, potrebbe avvicinarsi e mordere qualsiasi cosa gli capita! Altrimenti, gli umani non hanno nulla da temere, i lupi non mordono né mangiano gli umani! Al contrario, siamo noi ad essere cacciati, intrappolati, avvelenati, maledetti, biasimati e portati all’estinzione dagli umani! Comunque il folklore ha il suo ruolo nell’influenzare gli umani. Ciò che è interessante è che fin dalla tenera età i bambini amano i lupi e gli altri animali selvatici e la natura, in seguito la loro opinione cambia nella direzione opposta, e qui le persone hanno bisogno di lavorare di più sull’educazione e mantenere il contatto con la natura per evitare questo deragliare.

Reporter Fauna Selvatica: Che dire delle accuse onnipresenti da parte degli agricoltori e dell’uccisione del loro bestiame?

Signor Lupo: Queste accuse sono sicuramente esagerate! Gli studi hanno dimostrato che una mucca statisticamente ha più probabilità di essere colpita da un tuono, investita da un’auto o morire a causa di malattie, piuttosto che essere uccisa da un lupo. Le pecore possono anche essere facilmente protette da cani da guardia, metodo molto vecchio ed efficiente! Le eccezioni si verificano, e questa è anche colpa degli umani, quando il bestiame è lasciato a pascolare nelle aree selvagge senza protezione e le prede selvatiche sono rare, o quando i giovani lupi, potenzialmente resi orfani dai cacciatori, potrebbero dover attaccare per non morire di fame!

Reporter Fauna Selvatica: Qualche desiderio per il 2018 e oltre?

Signor Lupo: La nostra più grande minaccia esistenziale oggi è l’incomprensione umana! Se le persone capissero il nostro ruolo nell’ecosistema e come funzionano davvero l’ecosistema e il pianeta, saremmo tutti in grado di vivere fianco a fianco, in armonia, come abbiamo fatto per milioni di anni! Desidero quindi maggiore comprensione, pace, più saggezza e un sano ecosistema da condividere e godere con tutti! E a tutti gli appassionati, auguro un’eccellente vacanza, insieme ai loro cari, Buon Natale e Felice Anno 2018, pieno di buone notizie dalla natura selvaggia!

.

Get to know the Wolf and start to protect him * impara a conoscere il Lupo per proteggelo

Amici del Lupo – Svizzera italiana

.

To all my beloved readers and follower…  I need your support!
Recently I opened a new blog with the desire to inform the public about the need to protect the Wolf.

I belong to a group of people who think that in Switzerland and in Ticino, there is also place for the wolf.
With us there are experts but also simple enthusiasts of Nature and fans of this beautiful animal.

In the face of prejudices, alarms and inaccurate news, when not even deliberately false, with this page we try to bring the Voice of common sense, based on scientific data. Right now, in Switzerland, the wolf risks losing its status as “absolutely protected animal”.

For Switzerland to kill the wolf would be a moral defeat, a demonstration of closure and inability to adapt, of international proportions.

We make our commitment for this not to happen! Help us to support this project, following the blog, spreading our Facebook account.
Thank you so much.

:-)claudine giovannoni

…oOo…

 

A tutti i miei lettori e seguaci… Ho bisogno del vostro sostegno!
Da poco ho sviluppato un nuovo blog con il desiderio di informare l’opinione pubblica in merito alla necessità di proteggere il Lupo.

Faccio parte di un gruppo eterogeneo di persone che pensano che in Svizzera ed in Ticino ci sia posto anche per il lupo.
Tra di noi ci sono esperti ma anche semplici appassionati della natura e fan di questo bellissimo animale.

Di fronte a pregiudizi, allarmismi e notizie inesatte, quando non addirittura volutamente false, con questa pagina cerchiamo di portare la Voce del Buonsenso, basandoci su dati scientifici. In questo momento, in Svizzera, il lupo rischia di perdere il suo status di “animale assolutamente protetto”. Per la Svizzera prendere a fucilate il lupo sarebbe una sconfitta morale, una dimostrazione di chiusura e incapacità di adattamento, di proporzioni internazionali.

Metteremo il nostro impegno affinché questo non accada! Aiutaateci a sostenere questo progetto, seguendo il blog, diffondendo il nostro account su Facebook.
Grazie di cuore.

:-)claudine giovannoni

 

We want to prevent the killing of wolves in Switzerland

We are a heterogeneous group of people who think that in Switzerland and in Ticino there is also a place for the wolf.
Between us, there are experts but also simple enthusiasts of nature and fans of this beautiful animal.

In the face of prejudices, alarms and inaccurate news, when not deliberately false, with this page we try to bring the Voice of good sense, based on scientific data. Right now, in Switzerland, the wolf risks losing its status as “absolutely protected animal”. For Switzerland to shoot the wolf would be a moral defeat, a demonstration of closure and inability to adapt, of international proportions.

We will make our commitment for this to happen!

…oOo…

Siamo un gruppo eterogeneo di persone che pensano che in Svizzera ed in Ticino ci sia posto anche per il lupo.
Tra di noi ci sono esperti ma anche semplici appassionati della natura e fan di questo bellissimo animale.

Di fronte a pregiudizi, allarmismi e notizie inesatte, quando non addirittura volutamente false, con questa pagina cerchiamo di portare la Voce del Buonsenso, basandoci su dati scientifici. In questo momento, in Svizzera, il lupo rischia di perdere il suo status di “animale assolutamente protetto”. Per la Svizzera prendere a fucilate il lupo sarebbe una sconfitta morale, una dimostrazione di chiusura e incapacità di adattamento, di proporzioni internazionali.

Metteremo il nostro impegno affinché questo non accada!

 

This is the new blog… please give your support and love to the wolves!  Thank you   :-)claudine

https://amicidelluposvizzeraitaliana.wordpress.com/

https://www.facebook.com/LupoSvizzeraitaliana/

 

.

We stole their land, their home…

lupi

With near certainty, when you were a child, your mother or grandmother will have told you the fairy tale of the “Little Red Riding Hood”…
Certainly, lupus in fabula has brought terrible prejudices toward this animal itself little different from his brother, the faithful man’s friend: the dog.
For centuries, this poor creature was hunted and persecuted, using any pretext.
Gradually man has “stolen” his territory, nothing new, in fact, what this is happening at this very moment in every corner of the planet Earth while hundreds of breeds of animals become extinct.
What is most shocking, in our small nation so cosmopolitan and open-minded (Switzerland), there are people who “support the radical elimination of any large predator (wolf, lynx, bear) in Switzerland.”
At the present time, the wolf is a protected animal and therefore can not be killed.

Bern, May 26, 2016 – The Environment Commission of the National Council (CESPE-N) recommends no more consider the wolf a strictly protected animal and asks to hunt. There has yet been a vote on Federal Cambers…

Unfortunately, the events of the recent weeks (the killing by wolves of different sheep in unguarded flocks), brought again to the fore the issue unleashing the outrage of several troglodytes who would now kill them all.
But this is not the solution because to act this way isn’t ethically correct, and that even if it were supported by a change in our federal law.

There are several studies that have considered the problem of protection of the flock and the solutions are different: for example, the Abruzzese Maremma sheepdogs, or even the llama, camelid native of South America.
Just in Ticino, there are a couple of companies that use this animal with excellent results: they have never had their flock attacked by wolves. Of course, it should be emphasized that sheep were attacked by the wolf in a flock NOT guarded, for breeders is certainly easier (and cheaper) to leave the sheep into the fray because a pastor or the dogs are a significant financial investment.

cane_pastore_maremmano_abruzzese

cane pastore maremmano abruzzese

 

Inside an article (Copyright: Susanna Petrone) of the WWF Switzerland dated in the year 2015, it refers that in our country they live between 25 and 30 wolves. The pack had not grown up since 11 specimens had been killed (including two specimens killed by poachers).
The wolf, like all predators, is a natural regulator of the game. His presence is an opportunity for agriculture and viticulture. In fact, the abandonment of vast alpine areas by humans has created conditions for the growth of wildlife populations.
As a result, we are now confronted with a large number of hoofed animals that cause damage to forests, crops, and vineyards.
But it is also so important to remember that the return of the wolf (should) forces sheep farmers to better monitor their flocks and to check out more the pastures. The free grazing, ie the practice of the sheep spending the summer in the mountain unattended, is a relatively new phenomenon, which for animals bred not only has advantages. In fact, of the approximately 200,000 sheep present in the mountains – and not kept -, each year about 4,000 lose their lives due to illness and falls. While less than 10% of deaths are due to large predators.
The wolf obliges farmers to rethink their habits and contributes to the sustainability of sheep. And, though it may seem paradoxical, saves the lives of hundreds of animals. 

We can learn to live with these wild animals to whom man, for centuries, steal the land, building up to the limit of the areas they once populated.
Another example of human insensitivity (see the statistic at the end after the Italian translation), and how deep my brain is thinking… I’m sure that foxes don’t attack the flocks nor man… maybe they raid of hens and eggs in poultry houses (ecological ones where the chickens roam free because certainly, foxes doesn’t enter in the “slaughter poultry factories.” So tell me, why in 2015 in Switzerland alone were killed 25,000 foxes (those declared) and who knows how much more by the poachers.

 

…oOo…

.

Con quasi certezza, quand’eravate bambini, la vostra mamma o la nonna vi avrà raccontato la fiaba “Cappuccetto rosso”…
Di certo, lupus in fabula, ha portato dei terribili preconcetti verso questo animale di per sé poco diverso dall’amico fedele dell’uomo: il cane.
Da secoli, questa povera creatura è stata cacciata e perseguitata, utilizzando ogni pretesto.
A poco a poco l’uomo ha “rubato” il suo territorio, nulla di nuovo, in effetti ciò sta accadendo in questo preciso istante in ogni angolo del pianeta Terra mentre centinaia di specie animali si estinguono.
Quanto di più scioccante, nella nostra piccola nazione così tanto cosmopolita e d’apertura mentale, ci sono  persone che “sostengono l’eliminazione radicale di ogni grande predatore (lupo, lince, orso) sul territorio svizzero”.
Al momento attuale, il lupo è un animale protetto e pertanto non può essere ucciso.

Berna, 26 maggio 2016 – La Commissione dell’Ambiente del Consiglio nazionale (CAPTE-N) raccomanda di non più considerare il lupo un animale strettamente protetto e chiede di poterlo cacciare. Non vi è ancora stata una votazione alle camere federali… 

Purtroppo i fatti accaduti in queste ultime settimane (l’uccisione da parte di lupi di diverse pecore in greggi non custoditi), ha fatto tornare alla ribalta la questione scatenando l’indignazione di parecchi trogloditi che vorrebbero ora sterminarli.
Ma questa non è la soluzione in quanto agire in questo modo non è eticamente corretto, neppure se fosse supportato da una modifica di legge.

Vi sono diversi studi che si sono chinati sul problema della protezione delle greggi e le soluzioni sono diverse: ad esempio i cani pastori maremmani abruzzesi oppure anche il lama, camelide originario del Sud America.
Proprio in Ticino vi sono un paio di aziende che utilizzano questo animale con eccellenti risultati: non hanno mai avuto il loro gregge aggredito dai lupi. Certo va sottolineato che gli ovini assaliti dal lupo erano in un gregge NON custodito, per gli allevatori è certamente più facile (e meno costoso) lasciare le pecore allo sbaraglio in quanto un pastore oppure dei cani sono un investimento finanziario non trascurabile.

lama

il lama un eccellente guardiano di greggi

In un articolo (Copyright: Susanna Petrone) del WWF Svizzera  del 2015, si riferisce che nel nostro paese vivono tra i 25 e i 30 lupi. Il branco non era cresciuto, visto che 11 esemplari erano stati abbattuti (inclusi due esemplari uccisi dai bracconieri).
Il lupo, come tutti i predatori, è un regolatore naturale della selvaggina. La sua presenza è una chance per agricoltura e viticoltura. Infatti l’abbandono di vaste aree alpine da parte dell’uomo, ha creato le condizioni per la crescita delle popolazioni di animali selvatici.
Di conseguenza ci troviamo ora confrontati con un numero elevato di ungulati che causano danni a boschi, colture e vigneti.
È però anche sì doveroso ricordare che ritorno del lupo (dovrebbe) costringe(re) gli allevatori di ovini a sorvegliare meglio le loro greggi e a controllare di più i pascoli. Il pascolo libero, ossia la pratica di far trascorrere l’estate agli ovini in montagna senza sorveglianza, è un fenomeno relativamente nuovo, che per gli animali allevati non presenta solo vantaggi. Infatti, dei circa 200 mila ovini presenti in montagna – e non custoditi -, ogni anno circa 4 mila perdono la vita a causa di malattia e cadute. Mentre meno del 10% delle morti è riconducibile a grandi predatori.
Il lupo obbliga gli allevatori a ripensare le proprie abitudini e contribuisce a una gestione più sostenibile degli ovini. E, per quanto possa sembrare paradossale, salva la vita a centinaia di animali.

Possiamo imparare a convivere con questi animali selvaggi ai quali l’uomo, da secoli, ruba il territorio, costruendo ai limitar delle zone da essi popolate.
Altro esempio dell’insensibilità umana, questa sottostante è una statistica, e per quanto mi arrovelli il cervello… le volpi non attaccano i greggi e neppure l’uomo… forse fanno razia di galline e uova nei pollai (quelli ecologici dove i poveri pollastri vivono in libertà poiché le volpi di certo non entrerebbero nelle “fabbriche di pollame da macello”). Allora ditemi, perché nel 2015 solo in Svizzera sono state uccise 25.000 volpi (quelle dichiarate) e chissà quante altre da bracconieri.

Animali uccisi   (killed animals)
Capriolo    (deer) 42 623
Volpe         (fox)
24 495  
Camoscio    (chamois) 11 719

Fonte: UFAM – Statistica federale della caccia  (Svizzera)

.

lupi_europei

 

 

Protecting the wolf… (& the sheeps) * proteggere il lupo… (e le pecore)

(images from the web – interview with F. Maggi responsible of WWF Ticino)

Il WWF Svizzera apprende con gioia della presenza di una lupa con i suoi cuccioli in Valle Morobbia. Ora tocca alle autorità: è urgente sostenere gli allevatori e proteggere le greggi.
Il WWF saluta l’arrivo della prima cucciolata di lupi in Ticino. Il ritorno spontaneo dei grandi predatori nelle Alpi è un fenomeno naturale e inevitabile, in atto già da decenni . Esso rappresenta un contributo indispensabile per il riequilibrio delle popolazioni di ungulati.

Il lupo è una opportunità per l’agricoltura
II lupo, come tutti i predatori,è un regolatore naturale della selvaggina. La sua presenza è una chance per agricoltura e viticoltura. Infatti l’abbandono di vaste aree alpine da parte dell’uomo, ha creato le condizioni per la crescita delle popolazioni di animali selvatici.
Di conseguenza ci troviamo ora confrontati con un numero elevato di ungulati che causano danni a boschi, colture e vigneti.
Il lupo, predando gli ungulati ma soprattutto modificando il loro comportamento, contribuisce a ridurne i danni. Non è un caso se la Società forestale svizzera, in una lettera datata aprile di quest’anno, destinata alla Consigliera Federale Doris Leuthard, si è detta favorevole alla presenza del lupo, sottolineandone l’importante funzione per le foreste.

Il fucile non risolve i problemi
In Ticino sono stati fatti finora solo timidi passi per gestire il ritorno del lupo, il cui arrivo era certo già dagli anni ’90. Il “Gruppo cantonale grandi predatori” dovrebbe essere più attivo. Per questo motivo il WWF lancia un appello alle autorità: è necessario attuare celermente le misure necessarie per promuovere la convivenza con i grandi predatori.
Dal profilo biologico il ritorno del lupo rappresenta un arricchimento a favore della diversità biologico.
Ma il WWF è ben conscio che esso può rappresentare una fonte di problemi
per gli allevatori delle nostre valli.
È necessario, pertanto, cercare una soluzione in grado di bilanciare gli interessi naturalistici e quelli agricoli: le greggi vanno protette meglio, come già viene fatto in altri cantoni e all’estero

Convivere con il lupo è un dovere, le soluzioni ci sono
Recentemente anche il Papa nella sua Enciclica ha ricordato che ogni
specie va protetta e preservata:  “possiamo lamentare l’estinzione di una specie come fosse una mutilazione”.
Il rispetto della natura e la conservazione delle specie è ormai un valore morale universalmente riconosciuto.
Il WWF invita le autorità e i cittadini a cogliere questa occasione per mostrare di essere degni di tale valore.

Per maggiori informazioni o interviste:
Francesco Maggi, responsabile WWF Svizzera italiana
Massimo Mobiglia, presidente WWF Ticino

.

HOMEPAGE_LOGO-HQ

.

In questo link trovate delle linee guida per la  Custodia, allevamento e utilizzo dei cani da protezione delle greggi  (italian language)

(cani pastori maremmani abruzzesi)

 

.

WWF Switzerland learned with joy of the presence of a wolf with her cubs in the Valley Morobbia (Ticino, south part of Switzerland) . Now it’s up to the authorities: it is urgent to support milk farmers and protect their flocks.

WWF welcomes the arrival of the first litter of wolves in Ticino. The spontaneous return of large predators in the Alps is a natural and inevitable, in place for decades. It is an indispensable contribution to the rebalancing of ungulate populations.

The wolf is an opportunity for agriculture
The wolf, like all predators, is a natural regulator of the game. His presence is a chance for agriculture and viticulture. In fact, the abandonment of vast alpine areas by humans, has created conditions for the growth of wildlife populations.
As a result we are now confronted with a large number of ungulates that cause damage to forests, crops and vineyards.
The wolf, preying on ungulates but also changing their behavior, helps to reduce the damage. It is no coincidence that the Swiss Forestry Society, in a letter dated April this year, for the Federal Councillor Doris Leuthard, were in favor of the presence of the wolf, underlining the important role for the forests.

The gun does not solve problems
Ticino has been made so far only tentative steps to manage the return of the wolf, whose arrival was not since the 90s. “Gruppo cantonale grandi predatori” should be more active. For this reason the WWF appeals to the authorities: it is necessary to quickly implement the necessary measures to promote coexistence with large predators.
From the biological point the return of the wolf is an enrichment in favor of biological diversity.
But the WWF is well aware that it can be a source of problems for breeders of our valleys.
You must, therefore, look for a solution that would balance the interests of natural and agricultural ones: the flocks must be protected better, as is done in other cantons and abroad.

Living with the wolf is a duty, there are solutions
Recently, the Pope in his encyclical reminded that every species should be protected and preserved: “we can lament the extinction of a species like a mutilation”.
Respect for nature and the conservation of species is now a universally recognized moral value.
WWF calls on the authorities and citizens to seize this opportunity to show that they are worthy of that value.

For more information or interviews:
Francesco Maggi, responsible for WWF in the italian part of Switzerland
Massimo Mobiglia, President WWF Ticino

Dog_sheeps

  • Claudine’s novels * i miei romanzi

  • Piccoli passi nella Taiga (to be published soon)

  • Il Segreto degli Annwyn – Edizioni Ulivo ISBN 978 88 98 018 079

  • The Annwyn’s Secret Austin Macauley London ISBN 9781785544637 & ISBN 9781785544644

  • The Annwyn’s Secret

  • Silloge Poetica “Tracce” – Edizioni Ulivo Balerna

  • Il Kumihimo del Sole – Seneca Edizioni Torino

    ISBN: 978-88-6122-060-7
  • Il Cristallo della Pace – Seneca Edizioni Torino

    ISBN 978-88-6122-189-5
  • Nebbie nella Brughiera – Seneca Edizioni Torino

    ISBN 978-88-6122-055-3
  • I 4 Elementi – Macromedia Edizioni Torino

  • Cats are my inspiration!

  • Remember, transitioning to a plant-based diet that embraces compassion for the animals, your health and our planet isn’t really difficult. You just have to want to do it! For the sake of us all... :-)claudine
  • Amici del Lupo – Svizzera italiana

  • Donate… to help them!

  • Donate… to help them!

  • Donate… to help them!

  • Blog Stats

    • 61,119 hits
  • Translate